ABOUT THIS CONFERENCE

We are delighted to once again offer our A Level Latin conference, NEW for 2020, which promises to be another informative, stimulating and enjoyable conference for all A Level Latin teachers, Heads of Classics and others involved in promoting Classics at A Level.

The conference promotes some new sessions for this year, while also giving focus to the 2021 and 2022 text options. New sessions include Exam Paper Reflections on Cicero 2020, ‘New tricks for old dogs? Fresh ideas for A level Latin, both sessions led by Henry Cullen, (Head of Classics, Colfe’s School) and Turning Sixth-Formers into Literary Critics, led by Dom Jones (Classics teacher Westminster College).

This year we are pleased to welcome back Dr Kathryn Tempest  (Senior Lecturer, University of Roehampton)   Dr Llewelyn Morgan (Professor of Classical Languages and Literature, Fellow, Brasenose College, University of Oxford), and Rob Cromarty (Classics, Wellington College – invited)

Speakers will be available during the day for discussion or questions. As always, Hellenic Books will be displaying at the conference.

BENEFITS OF ATTENDING

By the end of the course, delegates will have:

  • Hear from distinguished experts discuss the texts
  • Find out more about Cicero’s rhetorical strategies
  • Take opportunity to reflect on the Cicero 2020 exam paper questions
  • Gain fresh approaches for teaching A level Latin
  • Take away techniques and approaches to make verse unseen more accessible
  • Opportunities for discussion on ways to maximise student performance

KEYNOTE SPEAKERS

Dr Llewelyn Morgan Professor of Classical Languages and Literature, Fellow, Brasenose College, University of Oxford

Katharine Radice Curriculum Leader for Classics, Stephen Perse Foundation, Cambridge

Dr Kathryn Tempest  Senior Lecturer, University of Roehampton

Henry Cullen  Head of Classics, Colfe’s School

Dom Jones – Classics teacher, Westminster College

Rob Cromarty (invited) Head of Classics, Wellington College

DATE & LOCATION:  London | Friday 27 November 2020
WHO SHOULD ATTEND? 
  • Heads of Classics
  • A Level Latin teachers
  • Leaders involved in promoting Classics
COURSE CODE  7898
INCLUDED
  • A specially prepared folder of 50+ pages full of detailed notes, practical advice and guidance
  • Notes prepared by the educational experts leading the course
  • Expert produced PowerPoint presentations
  • CPD Certificate of attendance
  • Two course restaurant lunch
  • Refreshments throughout the day
  • Guaranteed high quality venues

 

09:55 – 10:00am Welcome and Introduction

Henry Cullen, Head of Classics, Colfe’s School

10.00 – 10.50am Cicero’s rhetorical strategies & exam paper reflection

  • Character assassination: biting invective in the Philippics
  • Cicero’s relationship with the truth
  • How to convince an audience, Cicero-style
  • Review of the Cicero questions in the 2020 exam; possible topics for 2021

Dr Kathryn Tempest Senior Lecturer, University of Roehampton & Henry Cullen, Head of Classics, Colfe’s School

10.50 – 11.10am: Morning Break

11.10 – 11.55am: Option Strand 1

1A  –  Cicero 2022-23 selection – Pro Cluentio

  • Putting our A-Level selection in context: essential knowledge for teachers
  • Key themes in the speech: what to look out for
  • How strong a case does Cicero really have?
  • Detecting Ciceronian sleight of hand

Dr Kathryn Tempest  Senior Lecturer, University of Roehampton

1B   New tricks? Fresh ideas for A-Level Latin

  • Not just another unseen: diverse approaches to develop specific skills
  • A boring (?) vocab test: finding ways to enliven and deepen routine testing
  • Don’t know, don’t care? How to help students connect and relate to their set texts

Henry Cullen Head of Classics, Colfe’s School

 12.00 – 12.45pm: Option Strand 2

2A – Tacitus’ telling of history – to cover both 2021 and 2022 options (Histories 1, Annals 4).

  • Politics and theatre in Tacitus’ studies of power
  • Tiberius on the turn: Annals 4 as the prelude to disaster
  • How does Tacitus control tone and mood?
  • Tacitus’ manipulation of information: deployment of fact and suggestion

Rob Cromarty, Wellington College

2B: How to get your pupils good at the gobbet

  • Moving on from GCSE habits: what’s helpful?; what’s harmful?
  • Making the most of their English skills
  • Creative translation exercises: tasks to develop sensitive reading
  • Different kinds of gobbet: varying the task and the demands on the critic

Dom Jones, Classics Teacher, Westminster School

12.45 – 1.30pm: Lunch

1.30 – 2.20pm: Option Strand  3

3A : Virgil – the end of the Aeneid – to cover both Aeneid XI and Aeneid XII – the option coming on to the A-Level (2022 exam, teaching from this September)

  • Cat and mouse in Aeneid XI
  • Duel upon duel – narrative links across books XI and XII
  • The role of the divine in settling the human conflict
  • Virgil’s manipulation of his reader’s sympathies

Dr Llewelyn Morgan Professor of Classical Languages and Literature, Fellow, Brasenose College, University of Oxford

3B: Prose Composition

  • Review of the 2020 paper: which sections were hardest, and what were opportunities for ‘style’?
  • Getting it right in Year 12: how to approach prose comp post-GCSE
  • Differentiating up and down: stretching the top and keeping the weakest afloat
  • Maximising the OCR mark scheme, incl. ‘What counts as good style?’

Dom Jones, Classics Teacher, Westminster School

2.25 – 3.15pm: Option Strand 4

4A – NEW  Catullus – 2022-23 selection  Poems 5, 6, 7, 8, 10, 11, 17, 40, 70, 76, 85, 88, 89, 91, 107

  • Master of his form: metre and genre in the Catullus selection
  • Text and intertextuality: Catullus and his literary models
  • Catullus and ‘Catullus’ – the use of poetic persona
  • The poetics of passion – using language to convey raw emotion

Dr Llewelyn Morgan Professor of Classical Languages and Literature, Fellow, Brasenose College, University of Oxford

4B – Making verse unseens more accessible

  • What’s so hard about translating verse?  Seeing things from the pupil’s persepctive
  • Beware the deep end: grading the difficulty of unseens, and starting in steps
  • Which word to take next?  How to help students who can’t get started
  • Quirks of Ovid: vocab, idiom and the role of the unexpected

Henry Cullen, Head of Classics, Colfe’s School

3.15 – 3.20pm: Afternoon Tea

3.20 – 3.50pm: Maximising student performance – what works well?

  • Marginal gains in Year 13: what makes the difference in language and literature?
  • A plenary session for teachers to share ideas

Henry Cullen, Head of Classics, Colfe’s School

Dr Llewelyn Morgan Professor of Classical Languages and Literature, Fellow, Brasenose College, University of Oxford

Katharine Radice Curriculum Leader for Classics, Stephen Perse Foundation, Cambridge

Dr Kathryn Tempest  Senior Lecturer, University of Roehampton

Henry Cullen  Head of Classics, Colfe’s School

Dom Jones – Classics teacher, Westminster College

Rob Cromarty (invited) Head of Classics, Wellington College