ABOUT THIS COURSE

The recent challenges faced by schools have shed new light on the importance of structuring GCSE English curriculums that adopt a more holistic approach combining core knowledge, skills, and concepts with the continuing need to meet the requirements of the specification. This course will help you address these challenges through an examination of some of the core (or threshold) concepts in English whilst considering how they can be used to deliver GCSE English curriculum.

Delegates will consider five core concepts important to the teaching of English: verbal reasoning, structure, sentences, re-presentation, and dialectics and rhetoric.  There will be opportunities to look at innovative teaching strategies, explore how these concepts link to the GCSE English curriculum (with particular emphasis on AQA’s specifications) and how core concept-centred curriculum planning enables effective co-teaching of Language and Literature.  Each session will be accompanied by a wealth of new resources that can be used in the classroom and to stimulate faculty training and discussion.

BENEFITS OF ATTENDING:

  • Develop an understanding of core reading concepts and how these inform our teaching
  • Explore multi-modal approaches to English, including media and film, and how they can impact positively on students’ learning experiences
  • Connect core concepts to AQA GCSE English and English Literature
  • Consider practical applications of theory
  • Take away numerous resources, lesson plans and teaching ideas that can be used in the classroom and in faculty training
WHO SHOULD ATTEND? 
  • This course is designed for all teachers of English.
  • Heads of English departments
  • SLT links with responsibility for English
  • It will benefit considerably those new to the profession.
COURSE CODE 8814
DATE London | Monday 13 December 2021
IN-SCHOOL You can also book this as an In-School Course
INCLUDED
  • You will receive a specially prepared file electronically containing detailed notes, and teaching materials and resources which will be of immediate practical benefit in the classroom.
  • Expert produced PowerPoint presentations
  • CPD Certificate of attendance

10.00 – 10.15am: The challenges of GCSE English Literature specifically when looking at Shakespeare.

  • Explaining the grading structure and the skills being assessed when students are working on Shakespeare- how much context is needed? What is quality context?
  • Looking at language- what is it the students are asked to do and what are they expected to do if being awarded a Grade 9.

 

10.15-11.30am: Romeo and Juliet- expert insights  

  • Shakespeare’s use of the soliloquy. Why did Shakespeare use this style so often? Discussion on effect in relation to the overall play and context. Practical methods to avoid the more general comments on “internal monologues” and developing academic discussion on effect in relation to the overall play and context.
  • Thinking about style- practical strategies to investigate the varying styles of Shakespeare’s language and what the intention was and how this translates into meaning in relation to major themes in Romeo and Juliet.
  • Debunking common context myths such as living in a Patriarchal society, the control of the Church, women’s roles etc…
  • What is the difference between an image and a motif? Why are both used within Shakespeare’s Romeo and Juliet? How do these add to the layers of meaning?
  • Shakespeare’s language- slurs and their impact on the audience- why are these important?

 

11.30-11.45am: Break

 

11.45-12.45pm: The challenges of GCSE English Literature specifically when looking at Shakespeare’s Romeo and Juliet.

  • Applying the knowledge to exam questions- what is top grade analysis? How much is too much? Analysis in a succinct manner.
  • Dealing effectively with context, writer’s technique and personal viewpoint in analysing Romeo and Juliet..
  • Focusing on specific examples of when context comments actually add merit to the grades awarded, rather being a “throw away” comment.
  • How might we discuss Shakespeare’s slurs using academic language?
  • Key scenes that really encourage the top ability students to think.

 

12.45– 1.45pm: Lunch

 

1.45 – 2:45pm: Macbeth- expert insights

  • Thinking about style- practical strategies to investigate the varying styles of Shakespeare’s language and what the intention was and how this translates into meaning in relation to major themes in Macbeth.
  • Religious and natural imagery that recurs in Macbeth- why Shakespeare relies on certain images?
  • Context- King James and witchcraft- how important is this? Where to really focus when it comes to context in Macbeth.
  • Lady Macbeth as the fourth witch- how accurate is this evaluation in relation to the text? Where might we find examples be found to agree or disagree with this viewpoint.

 

2.45-2.50: Afternoon Break

 

2.50-3.50pm: The challenges of GCSE English Literature specifically when looking at Shakespeare’s Macbeth.

  • Applying the knowledge to exam questions- what is top grade analysis? How much is too much? Analysis in a succinct and perceptive manner.
  • Dealing effectively with context- the witches, patriarchal society, King James- Focusing on specific examples of when context comments actually add merit to the grades awarded, rather being a “throw away” comment.
  • How might we discuss Shakespeare’s intentions behind his language in Macbeth without simply repeating what it means?
  • Applying the knowledge of religious imagery to the question- how to get the students to really engage with imagery and analysis it well.
  • Key scenes that really encourage the top ability students to think.

 

3.50 – 4.00pm: Plenary and discussion

Depart

Dr Lance Hanson

Lance Hanson is an experienced teacher of English, school leader, teacher trainer and blogger. He currently works as the strategic lead for teaching, learning and curriculum for a multi-academy Trust. He has also examined GCSE English Language for almost two decades, written materials for exam board training, and has recently completed his PhD.