ABOUT THIS COURSE

This brand new GCSE English literature course focuses on honing your Shakespeare knowledge in order to enhance classroom practice when teaching the most able students. The programme place emphasis on the two main GCSE Shakespeare texts, Romeo and Juliet and Macbeth and will focus on concepts that will concrete the difference between a grade 7 and that of a grade 9.

Through a variety of focused sessions led by a leading Shakespeare expert and a top rated examiner, strategies will be provided to augment the understanding of the Shakespeare texts and new methods to approach the conceptualising of language, meaning and motifs.

BENEFITS OF ATTENDING:

  • Develop resources and strategies for teaching the language of Shakespeare, focusing on his intent in relation to style, slurs and soliloquys.
  • Increase your understanding of how context impacts on the plays, how to reference this in ways that are meaningful.
  • Develop strategies and resources to explore high grade concepts such as religious imagery, moral standing, natural imagery and difference in play genres.
  • Take away ideas and suggestions for teaching effectively a range Shakespeare texts.
  • Enjoy an opportunity to share examples of good practice effectively in the classroom, especially if students are of an outstanding calibre.
WHO SHOULD ATTEND? 
  • All teachers of GCSE English Literature.
  • Heads of English,
  • English ECT’s
COURSE CODE 8811
DATE Online | Tuesday 16 November 2021
London | Thursday 20 January 2022
IN-SCHOOL You can also book this as an In-School Course
INCLUDED
  • You will receive a specially prepared file electronically containing detailed notes, and teaching materials and resources which will be of immediate practical benefit in the classroom.
  • Expert produced PowerPoint presentations
  • CPD Certificate of attendance

10.00 – 10.15am: The challenges of GCSE English Literature specifically when looking at Shakespeare.

  • Explaining the grading structure and the skills being assessed when students are working on Shakespeare- how much context is needed? What is quality context?
  • Looking at language- what is it the students are asked to do and what are they expected to do if being awarded a Grade 9. 

 

10.15-11.30am: Romeo and Juliet- expert insights

  • Shakespeare’s use of the soliloquy. Why did Shakespeare use this style so often? Discussion on effect in relation to the overall play and context. Practical methods to avoid the more general comments on “internal monologues” and developing academic discussion on effect in relation to the overall play and context.
  • Thinking about style- practical strategies to investigate the varying styles of Shakespeare’s language and what the intention was and how this translates into meaning in relation to major themes in Romeo and Juliet.
  • Debunking common context myths such as living in a Patriarchal society, the control of the Church, women’s roles etc…
  • What is the difference between an image and a motif? Why are both used within Shakespeare’s Romeo and Juliet? How do these add to the layers of meaning?
  • Shakespeare’s language- slurs and their impact on the audience- why are these important?

 

11.30-11.45am: Break

 

11.45-12.45pm: The challenges of GCSE English Literature specifically when looking at Shakespeare’s Romeo and Juliet.

  • Applying the knowledge to exam questions- what is top grade analysis? How much is too much? Analysis in a succinct manner.
  • Dealing effectively with context, writer’s technique and personal viewpoint in analysing Romeo and Juliet..
  • Focusing on specific examples of when context comments actually add merit to the grades awarded, rather being a “throw away” comment.
  • How might we discuss Shakespeare’s slurs using academic language?
  • Key scenes that really encourage the top ability students to think.

 

12.45– 1.45pm: Lunch

 

1.45 – 2:45pm: Macbeth- expert insights

  • Thinking about style- practical strategies to investigate the varying styles of Shakespeare’s language and what the intention was and how this translates into meaning in relation to major themes in Macbeth.
  • Religious and natural imagery that recurs in Macbeth- why Shakespeare relies on certain images?
  • Context- King James and witchcraft- how important is this? Where to really focus when it comes to context in Macbeth.
  • Lady Macbeth as the fourth witch- how accurate is this evaluation in relation to the text? Where might we find examples be found to agree or disagree with this viewpoint.

 

2.45-2.50: Afternoon Break

 

2.50-3.50pm: The challenges of GCSE English Literature specifically when looking at Shakespeare’s Macbeth.

  • Applying the knowledge to exam questions- what is top grade analysis? How much is too much? Analysis in a succinct and perceptive manner.
  • Dealing effectively with context- the witches, patriarchal society, King James- Focusing on specific examples of when context comments actually add merit to the grades awarded, rather being a “throw away” comment.
  • How might we discuss Shakespeare’s intentions behind his language in Macbeth without simply repeating what it means?
  • Applying the knowledge of religious imagery to the question- how to get the students to really engage with imagery and analysis it well.
  • Key scenes that really encourage the top ability students to think.

 

3.50 – 4.00pm: Plenary and discussion

Depart