Dates:
Tuesday 06 October 2020
Tuesday 03 November 2020

Code: 8207

ABOUT THIS WEBINAR

The AQA GCSE music Study Pieces are changing – and getting your head around the new pieces can be a real challenge!  This webinar will focus on the new optional Study Pieces for Area of Study 2: Popular Music: Three Tacks from Melkin’s Little Shop of Horrors, that replace the Three Songs from The Beatles’ Sergeant Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band (first teaching from September 2020, first examinations from summer 2022).

This webinar is designed to provide teachers with the skills to teach confidently and accurately those aspects of the piece that are of relevance to the types of question found in the examination.  Rather than providing a bar-by-bar analysis of each track, the webinar will consider the music from the point of view of the style, with clear focus on how Melkin exploits different musical elements to enhance the drama.

BENEFITS OF THIS WEBINAR: 

  • Gain a sound, clear contextual perspective of the new Popular Music study pieces without having to spend hours analysing them yourself
  • Review the different demands of the two types of question (2-mark answers and the essay)
  • Explore the music in terms of the use of musical elements, as appropriate to the sorts of questions found in the AQA GCSE music examination
  • Take away approaches that excite students, cultivate a deeper music appreciation and raise grades in exams
  • Equip yourself to set appropriate practice questions around this study piece

PROGRAMME

4.00-4.05pm: Welcome and Introduction

4.05pm: Little Shop of Horrors in context

  • Putting the work in context as a comedy-horror
  • Placing the chosen tracks in the context of the musical
  • From Euripides to The Three Degrees (via Mozart and Strauss?): allusions to ‘highbrow’ and popular culture in the tracks
  • Key musical features of the tracks that place the story around 1960

4.20pm: Prologue/Little Shop of Horrors (Overture)                      

  • How Menken creates a sense of over-the-top drama in the Prologue by combining elements of film and rock music
  • How the song Little Shop of Horrors balances the comedy and horror aspects of the musical as a whole
  • Helping students gain higher marks by writing about the more complex aspects of this track, including more advanced aspects of the use of harmony
  • Key features likely to come up in Question 8 (the 2-mark questions)

4.40pm: Mushnik and Son

  • How Mushnik’s character is defined in this song, with particular reference to features borrowed from Jewish Klezmer music
  • How both comedy and suspense are created within the song
  • Helping students gain higher marks by writing about the manipulation of harmony and tonality to enhance the mood and reflect the lyrics
  • Key features likely to come up in Question 8 (the 2-mark questions)

5.00pm: Feed me! (Git it!)           

  • How Audrey II’s evil character is revealed in this song, with particular reference to features borrowed from blues/jazz and rock
  • How musical contrasts (such as different textures, rhythms, harmonies) are used in this song to make it dramatic
  • Helping students gain higher marks by writing about how harmony, tonality, metre and rhythm are exploited to portray how Seymour is influenced by Audrey II
  • Key features likely to come up in Question 8 (the 2-mark questions)

5.20pm: Looking into the crystal ball: ideas for the sorts of essay questions that might be set

5.30: end

 

Dr Chris Maxim

Dr Chris Maxim began his career lecturing in higher education before moving into the secondary sector.  As an NQT (and Head of Music), he transformed the Music Department of a large inner-London secondary school, going on to create a thriving Performing Arts faculty and teaching KS3, GCSE and A-level.  Following many years in senior leadership, including as Acting Principal and Headteacher, he now works as a freelance musician (composer, conductor and organist) and education consultant, specialising in school leadership and music.  To find out more about him, please visit his website: www.christophermaxim.co.uk