Dates:

Monday 08 June 2020 – 4pm
Tuesday 29 September 2020 – 4pm

Code: 7959

ABOUT THIS WEBINAR

This new teacher webinar will consider how to develop students’ skills in answering the extended response questions on component 3 and component 4 of the A Level Music Technology course. Led by experienced author, examiner and head of department, James Reevell, it will discuss the core skills and suggest strategies to best prepare your students for the demands of the exam questions, using feedback from previous series along with ideas and resources from his own practice. The session will first focus on the exam requirements for question 5 and question 6 in component 3 and question 6 for component 4. There will be an emphasis on the application of theoretical work to help students make comparisons between two different tracks, using appropriate technical terminology, and to consider the wider impact of an aspect of technology in a track. The final part of the webinar will focus on evaluation skills related to a stimulus, for example a mix diagram or photo of a piece of equipment / recording situation.

Focus Points:

  • Building students’ skills in comparing two tracks using appropriate music technology terminology
  • Facilitating the student skills needed to evaluate the wider impact of technology: putting their technical theory into the context of what is required in the exam
  • Preparing students skills in evaluating a mixing scenario, picture or diagram for the analysing and producing paper, and supporting them in extending their answers for further credit

PROGRAMME

4:00pm: Welcome and Introduction

4:05pm:  Component 3, Question 5 – Comparing two tracks  

  • Scaffolding a comparison – helping to signpost students to the areas of music technology they should consider to effectively answer the question
  • AO3 and AO4 – how these work in context and how best to address them with students
  • The exam question – what the examiner is expecting to see for high marks in the comparison question
  • Building students’ skills in critical listening and using appropriate terminology for exam success
  • The musical impact – encouraging students to think about the effect of the technology used

4:35pm: Component 3, Question 6 – Evaluating the wider impact of technology in relation to a track                    

  • Understanding the wider impact: strategies to facilitate students’ evaluation of the wider impact of an aspect of music technology on the music industry
  • AO3 and AO4 – how these relate to the what the question is asking students to do and strategies to extend answers for further AO4 credit
  • A framework for addressing the exam question – strategies to help students plan their answers to achieve top band responses for this question
  • Areas of focus: exemplar discussion for sampling and pitch correction

4:55pm: Component 4, Question 6 – Evaluating a scenario, diagram or piece of equipment

  • What would it sound like? Discussion of screenshots to build students’ evaluation skills.
  • What is the examiner expecting to see in a good question 6 response?
  • Ways to build and develop students’ critical analysis and AO4 evaluation skills for question 6 success
  • Turning an AO3 into an AO4 – how to encourage students to build on their knowledge to effectively apply it to the scenario in the question.

5:10pm: Q&A and close

 

 

James Reevell

James Reevell is an experienced teacher of Music and Music Technology, and is currently Subject Leader for Visual and Creative Arts at a sixth form college in the North West of England. As part of this role he is responsible for the leadership and management of both Music courses, Art, Drama and Dance. He has over 5 years examining and assessment experience in Music and Music Technology and has set up both Music and Music Technology courses in a sixth form that went on to be graded as ‘Outstanding’ in its recent OFSTED inspection.  He has also led projects and training on stretch and challenge, effective use of data and effective transition from GCSE Music to A Level. Alongside his teaching role, he has recently been appointed as a Bridge Fellow for Music and Music Technology at the University of Huddersfield.